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How We Treat Iliolumbar Ligament Pain

Normally, iliolumbar ligament pain is the result of sports injuries that involved repeated bending or twisting the back. For example, golf and volleyball injuries are frequent causes of iliolumbar ligament problems; car accidents are another common one as well.

Iliolumbar ligament pain may sometimes be called iliac crest pain syndrome, iliolumbar syndrome for short. No matter what the cause, it’s always produced by tearing and/or inflammation in the iliolumbar ligament.

The iliolumbar ligament stretches from the back of the pelvis — the iliac crest — up towards the spine. Inflammation here can produce referred pain that seems to be coming from a variety of places: the back, the hip, the groin, the pelvis, or sometimes even the testicular, vaginal, or rectal areas. This referred pain can make it difficult to diagnose.

Signs of Iliolumbar Ligament Pain

Recurring, frequent lower back pain attacks are common symptoms of iliolumbar ligament pain. These attacks will tend to show up in a triangularly shaped region which is located between the so-called erector spinae muscles, the facet joints, the quadratus lumborum muscle, the lumbar fascia, and the iliolumbar ligaments. Painful attacks may be produced by almost any kind of physical exercise involving a bending or twisting of the lumbar spine.

In some cases, however, the pain only shows itself once the patient has been sitting down for some time — or even just during a brief period of time in the early morning, such as immediately after waking up and getting out of bed.

Lastly, patients with iliolumbar syndrome sometimes experience hip or groin pains next to the standard pains, possibly including some tenderness of the iliolumbar area as well.

Treating Iliolumbar Syndrome

Iliolumbar ligament pain may be difficult to diagnose, since it often involves pain in a variety of areas. Usually doctors assume it is a muscular strain, leading them to prescribe rest and ice.

Sadly, this approach does not actually help heal the damaged ligament, nor can it repair weak ligaments which produce the referred pain. This means that the chronic pain of iliolumbar ligament problems goes unresolved.

Iliolumbar Ligament Pain

iliolumbar ligament pain

After the more conservative program of treatment has failed, usually doctors prescribe anti-inflammatory drugs or steroids — yet these often produce more harm than they do good. Though they provide short term pain relief, in the long term these may be harmful, accelerating cartilage degeneration and inhibiting soft tissue healing.

Patients who don’t respond to even these treatments are usually referred to a surgeon. Yet since surgeons tend to rely on the X-ray as a diagnostic tool and X-rays usually fail to identify iliolumbar issues correctly, the surgeon may not recognize before the surgery that they are dealing with iliolumbar syndrome — and as a result they do not recognize the surgery will be unable to alleviate the iliolumbar ligament pain.

How We Treat Iliolumbar Ligament Pain

Instead of using harmful steroids or resorting to surgery, it is our experience that regenerative treatments like stem cells and PRP therapies may relieve ilolumbar syndrome in as little as a single visit to our office, without a hospital stay.

How is this possible? Regenerative therapies allow the body to repair itself quickly and effectively. They involve taking cells which are designed to promote rapid healing from places in the body where these cells are stored and then injecting them into the damaged area.

There, they promote healing and rapid tissue regeneration.

How Stem Cell Therapy Eases Pain & Helps Avoid Surgery

stem cell injections

stem cell therapy

Arlene Abrams of Cleveland, Ohio is a patient who has dealt with shoulder pain for over a decade. Despite undergoing surgery for a torn rotator cuff in her right shoulder, after a few years she started experiencing significant pain as well as a limited range of motion again. MRI scans of her shoulders showed major tearing, damage, and retraction — the only surgical option from there was total shoulder replacement.

However, Arlene preferred to avoid undergoing another round of surgery to her shoulder if at all possible. Thanks to stem cell therapy, she has so far been able to stay off the operating table.

Instead of going through surgery, Arlene decided to try regenerative medicine, as practiced by Regenerative Medicine Specialists. This cutting-edge type of treatment allows the body to regenerate injured tissues by regenerating them from the patient’s own stem cells. The therapy stimulates previously damaged tissues to the point that they regain their structure and begin to recover. With stem cell therapy, Arlene’s pain went down while her range of motion went up.

Within a few weeks after the procedure — which was performed at the Cleveland Shoulder Institute — Arlene noticed that it no longer stressed her shoulders to hold her “wiggly” 4-month-old granddaughter. “I no longer have pain” when she picks up laundry soap or a gallon of milk, she said. “I couldn’t be more pleased.”

Regenerative techniques use adult stem cells taken from the patient, sometimes combined with blood platelets, in order to speed up healing and repair in bone, joint, muscle, soft tissue, as well as nerve injuries.

All of us carry around stem cells which act as the body’s “repairmen.” Healthy regenerative stem cells exist in fat, the bone marrow, as well as some forms of connective tissue. Regenerative treatments take these healthy cells from parts of the body that are rich in them, then inject the cells into injured parts of the body which need them.

Because the cells have been taken from the patient’s own tissue, there’s no risk of rejection when they’re injected into the injured area. Often using ultrasonic guidance to ensure precise placement, the doctor injects the extracted cells directly into the injured ligament, tendon, muscle, nerve, joint, or bone. There is no hospital stay required.

Arelene had her stem cell treatments “right there in the doctor’s office,” she said. She first started noticing improvements in both her limited range of motion and chronic pain “about two weeks” following the procedure, and her condition has “continued to significantly improve” since then.

Regenerative medicine may represent a viable alternative for many patients who are looking to avoid surgery or ongoing steroid treatments in ever larger numbers. It can help with many conditions ranging from osteoarthritis to rotator cuff injuries, meniscus tears, tennis elbow, muscle strains, tendonitis and tendinosis, plantar fasciitis, nonunion fractures, compression nerve injuries, and many more.

Regenerative Medicine Specialists are skilled in using stem cell therapy not just on its own but also in combination with other regenerative techniques for maximum effectiveness. Depending on the condition our doctors may recommend a particular type of therapy such as lipoaspirate or stromal vascular fraction, or with the use of platelet rich plasma, cytokine, or growth factor therapy.

Stem Cell Injections May Soon Save Seniors From Losing Their Eyesight

stem cell treatment

stem cell injections

The treatment is still in the research phase, but a recent study indicates that stem cell injections might soon be able to slow or even reverse the effects of age-related eye degeneration in the early stages of the condition.

At the moment the disease is considered untreatable — and it’s one of the major causes of vision loss in people over the age of 65.

More than 15 million US adults are afflicted by age-related macular degeneration right now. The disease starts when the macula, the small central area of the retina, begins to deteriorate. Next to age, both environmental factors and genetic predispositions contribute to this macular degeneration.

The lead author of the research, Shaomei Wang of the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute’s Eye Program, has noted that this is the first work to show it’s possible to preserve vision by injecting only a single dose of the cells suffering from age-related macular degeneration.

After the researchers gave the rats a single shot of human adult-derived stem cells, their vision stayed preserved for some 130 days — the equivalent of around 16 human years.

Following the injection, the researchers noted that healthy cells began migrating towards the retina, where they formed a protective layer which held off ongoing degeneration. In order to produce the induced neural progenitor cells, the scientists started by converting adult human cells to induced pluripotent stem cells. From there, they made them into the needed human cell.

According to study contributing author Clive Svendsen, the induced progenitor cells represent a “unique source” of cells which are capable of slowing macular degeneration and associated vision loss.

Of course, researchers still need to gather additional data before clinical studies can begin. Nevertheless research is coming close to allowing doctors to begin offering adult stem cell injections as a customized treatment method for patients with macular degeneration and similar studies.

After this study’s promising results, researchers are starting to test the efficacy and safety of stem cell injections in animal models prior to moving to clinical trials in human patients.

Assuming the pre-clinical trials are successful, clinical trials will be designed later to test the potential benefit of stem cell injections for human age-related macular degeneration.

While stem cell therapy for age related macular degeneration is still a ways off where human patients are concerned, Regenerative Medicine Specialists currently offers the treatment for a variety of other conditions which interfere with valued activities and quality of life.

In our doctors’ experience, the treatments — which need minimal downtime and allow a fast return to work and play — can provide complete relief in just a single injection. Musculoskeletal, shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand, spine, hip, knee, and foot and ankle conditions are the main areas of focus for Regenerative Medicine Specialists.

Depending on the condition, our doctors may recommend one or more or a combination of stem cell injections, platelet rich plasma therapy, cytokine therapy, or growth factor therapy. All of these therapies focus on using the body’s own cells to produce rapid healing and regeneration — essentially allowing the body to repair itself.

Tampa Bay Rays’ Alex Cobb Undergoes PRP Therapy For Torn Elbow Ligament

The Tampa Bay Rays’ ace pitcher Alex Cobb has a partially torn elbow ligament that threatens to keep him off the field not just for this season but maybe even all of 2016. The team’s first choice? PRP therapy.

Cobb is currently undergoing two weeks of treatment with platelet rich plasma, as well as resting up. After this period, he’s expected to try and resume pitching to see if the PRP therapy has been enough to heal the injury.

If not, he would likely to have to undergo Tommy John surgery, which would sideline him for most of if not the entire 2016 season.

Reports only recently started coming out that Cobb’s rehab was halted by a diagnosis of a partially torn ligament based on an arthrogram, which is a detailed type of MRI exam, when he visited the doctor where he also had the PRP injection, Dr. James Andrews.

President of operations for the Rays, Matt Silverman, has commented only that the team is currently in “wait and see mode” as a result of the tests and would have a formal announcement soon. Silverman said that discussing the possibility of surgery at this point was “premature.”

The team is continuing to evaluate what their next steps might be, according to Silverman. Currently Cobb’s main focus is getting back to the pitching mound, and hopes are he can do it this season, but they do not currently have a timetable.

PRP treatment

PRP Therapy

Cobb has not yet commented to the media about his injury. The player has been on the sidelines since March 17, where he left a Clearwater game with an injury that was then called a strain or forearm tendinitis.

After several weeks of rest and doing no more strenuous activity for a few weeks than playing catch, by April 24 Cobb started throwing balls off a mound and was hoping to return to his team’s rotation by late May.

Operations president Silverman told the press that Cobb was progressing and feeling comfortable — he had even started “adding intensity” to his pitching — yet “something didn’t feel right.”

The team does not believe that Cobb experienced further injury during his rehab. The more detailed MRI arthrogram requires injecting dyes which can produce complications, which may be one reason the team waited.

Instead, the team has said they are continuing to follow the normal protocols for this type of injury, which started as a forearm strain. Since the forearm is so closely linked to the elbow, there are always concerns with forearm strains.

Pitchers who have remained active in spite of partial tears do have some history of success — the Yankees’ Masahiro Tanaka as well as Hall of Fame member Nolan Ryan, for example. To be sure there isn’t much risk for the Rays and Cobb to waiting a few weeks to see if the PRP therapy and rest helps heal the injury to the point where he can return at some point in June.

If he has to undergo Tommy John surgery, it’s not likely he’d return until past the 2016 season in any case.

Mission Trip to Africa

NewsDr. Cabaret is going on a Mission trip to Africa in June 30th – July 17th
Part of his trip Dr. Cab and his wife will be climbing Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania.
More info to come on how people can donate to the cause.

By | 2015-05-11T16:23:28+00:00 May 11th, 2015|Events|0 Comments